Treatments Offered


Chiropractic Adjustments:
Chiropractic spinal adjustment is unique and singular to the chiropractic profession, and that it "is characterized by a specific thrust applied to the vertebra utilizing parts of the vertebra and contiguous structures as levers to directionally correct articular malposition. Adjustment shall be differentiated from spinal manipulation in that the adjustment can only be applied to a vertebral malposition with the express intent to improve or correct the subluxation, whereas any joint, subluxated or not, may be manipulated to mobilize the joint or to put the joint through its range of motion... Chiropractic is a specialized field in the healing arts, and by prior rights, the spinal adjustment is distinct and singular to the chiropractic profession.

Therapeutic Ultrasound:
Ultrasound is applied using a transducer or applicator that is in direct contact with the patient's skin. Gel is used on all surfaces of the head to reduce friction and assist transmission of the ultrasonic waves. Therapeutic ultrasound in physical therapy is alternating compression and rarefaction of sound waves with a frequency of >20,000 cycles/second. Therapeutic ultrasound frequency used is 0.7 to 3.3 MHz. Maximum energy absorption in soft tissue occurs from 2 to 5 cm. Intensity decreases as the waves penetrate deeper. They are absorbed primarily by connective tissue: ligaments, tendons, and fascia (and also by scar tissue).Conditions which ultrasound may be used for treatment include the follow examples: Ligament Sprains, Muscle Strains, Tendonitis, Joint Inflammation, Plantar fasciitis, Metatarsalgia, Facet Irritation, Impingement syndrome, Bursitis, Rheumatoid arthritis, Osteoarthritis, and Scar Tissue Adhesion.

Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS), also known asneuromuscular electrical stimulation(NMES) orelectromyostimulation, is the elicitation of muscle contraction using electric impulses. EMS has received increasing attention in the last few years, because it has the potential to serve as: a strength training tool for healthy subjects and athletes; a rehabilitation and preventive tool for partially or totally immobilized patients; a testing tool for evaluating the neural and/or muscular function in vivo; a post-exercise recovery tool for athletes. The impulses are generated by a device and delivered through electrodes on the skin in direct proximity to the muscles to be stimulated. The impulses mimic the action potential coming from thecentral nervous system, causing the muscles to contract. The electrodes are generally pads that adhere to the skin. The use of EMS has been cited by sports scientists as a complementary technique for sports training and published research is available on the results obtained. In the United States, EMS devices are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Cold Laser Therapy:
Has primarily been shown useful in the short-term treatment of acutepaincaused byrheumatoid arthritis,osteoarthritis,tendinopathy,and possibly chronic joint disorders.LLLT has also been useful in the treatment of both acute and chronicneck pain. ACochrane Libraryreview concluded that low level laser therapy (LLLT) has insufficient evidence for treatment of nonspecificlow back pain,a finding echoed in a later review of treatments for chronic low back pain.Though it has been suggested for decades that LLLT could be useful in speedingwound healing, the appropriate parameters (dose, type of laser, materials, wavelength, etc.) have not been identified.Similarly, the use of lasers to treatchronic periodontitis and to speed healing ofinfections around dental implants is suggested, but there is insufficient evidence to indicate a use superior to traditional practices.

Intersegmental Traction:
Is a treatment used to induce motion into the spine. This therapy comes in the form of a table that you lay on. Inside of the table are three rollers that rotate and move from head to toe. The rollers gently roll up and down your spine.In addition to the incredible relaxation that you feel, this therapy is very beneficial to the health of your spine. Research shows that by putting your spine through this type of motion, you not only increase the range of motion of your spine but you pump the discs that are between the vertebrae of the spine. This is very helpful in preventing disc degeneration and “slipped discs”. This traction also improves the circulation of the spinal fluid that bathes the spinal cord and gives it its nutrition. How would our patients describe this therapy? Let’s suffice it to say that after their first intersegmental traction treatment, most of them want to buy one for their home!

Manual Therapy:
The three most notable forms of manual therapy are manipulation, mobilization and massage. Manipulation is the artful introduction of a rapid rotational, sheer or distraction force into an articulation. Manipulation is often associated with an audible popping sound caused by the instantaneous breakdown of gas bubbles that form during joint cavitation. Mobilization is a slower, more controlled process of articular and soft-tissue (myofascial)stretching intended to improve bio-mechanical elasticity. Massage is typically the repetitive rubbing, stripping or kneading of myofascial tissues to principally improve interstitial fluid dynamics.The differentiation between a manipulation and mobilization from a regulatory perspective is that a mobilization can be stopped at any point should the recipient decide to forgo the remainder of the procedure. On the other hand, a manipulation cannot be stopped by the practitioner once initiated. Manual therapy can be defined differently (according to the profession describing it for legal purposes) to state what is permitted within a practitioners scope of practice. Within the physical therapy profession, manual therapy is defined as a clinical approach utilizing skilled, specific hands-on techniques, including but not limited to manipulation/mobilization, used by the physical therapist to diagnose and treat soft tissues and joint structures for the purpose of modulating pain; increasing range of motion (ROM); reducing or eliminating soft tissue inflammation; inducing relaxation; improving contractile and non-contractile tissue repair, extensibility, and/or stability; facilitating movement; and improving function.

Therapeutic exercise: as bodily movement prescribed to correct an impairment, improve musculoskeletal function, or maintain a state of well-being.[1]It may vary from highly selected activities restricted to specific muscles or parts of the body, to general and vigorous activities that can return a convalescing patient to the peak of physical condition. Therapeutic exercise seeks to accomplish the following goals:

  • Enable ambulation
  • Release contracted muscles, tendons, and fascia
  • Mobilize joints
  • Improve circulation
  • Improve respiratory capacity
  • Improve coordination
  • Reduce rigidity
  • Improve balance
  • Promote relaxation
  • Improve muscle strength and, if possible, achieve and maintain maximal voluntary contractile force (MVC)
  • Improve exercise performance and functional capacity (endurance)